Dyslexia and More Vision

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In a recently published clinical study involving students between the ages of 7 to 11 years, investigators discovered that children with dyslexia exhibited more regressions and fixations than their typically-developed reading counterparts EVEN WHEN reading 1 YEAR BELOW their actual grade equivalent. In other words, even though they were reading text that was 1 year EASIER than what they were capable of reading, dyslexic children still showed WORSE regressions and fixations than their typically-developed reading counterparts. These worse fine eye movement patterns are representative of younger, or less accomplished, readers. The authors concluded that any child who has been diagnosed with dyslexia should have a visual skills evaluation in addition to a routine eye exam and a detailed literacy evaluation. Though not necessarily always causative, poor visual skills can be contributory to poor reading.

For more information, please contact Dr. Edward Fong and the Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

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Screen Time and Obesity

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Children ages 2-4 years who watched at least 2 hours of TV daily were significantly more likely to be obese according to a study conducted between 2009 and 2012. In another study involving over 1000 children ages 10-14 years, children who had 2-3 hours of screen time per day, regardless of whether it was for homework purposes or leisure, were significantly more likely to be obese. Yet another large-scale study showed that increased screen time was associated with increased risk of being overweight and increased consumption of high-fat/high-sugar foods.

For more information, contact Dr. Edward Fong and the Sugar Land eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.