Improper Contact Lens Use Leads to More Complications Than We Think

Contact Lens Health Week

According to a new report by the CDC, improper contact lens use sends people to the doctor or emergency rooms many more times per year than we might realize – almost 1 million times per year.  The greatest risk factor for contact lens complications according to the CDC is the improper use of contacts.  Unfortunately, studies show that between 40-90% of contact lens wearers do not follow proper wear and care instructions for their contacts.  Eye infections that can lead to blindness affect approximately 1 in 500 contact lens wearers every year.  According to the CDC report, bad habits such as sleeping in contact lenses, not throwing away contact lenses as frequently as instructed, using old cleaning solution, swimming in contacts and not replacing cases frequently enough increase the risk of complications many fold.  For more information, please visit the CDC site: http://www.cdc.gov/contactlenses/index.html

Cosmetics and Contact Lenses Sugar Land

Sugar Land Contacts Eye Exam Doctor Back to School

High-powered microscope view of contact lens deposits.

Estimates indicate that seventy percent of women use makeup around the eyes.  According to clinical studies, relatively large amounts of cosmetics migrate onto the eye’s surface within thirty minutes of application.  Cosmetic products, especially those that are marketed as “waterproof”, have been implicated in contact lens complications.  Mascara and eyeliner deposits on contacts have been shown to do the following to contact lenses:

1) change the physical shape of the contact lens

2) change the chemical characteristic of the contact lens

3) change the performance of the contact lens during wear.

All three of the above mentioned complications caused by cosmetic buildup on contacts can affect comfort, consistency of eyesight and health of the eyes with contact lens wear.  Other studies have also shown that cosmetic deposits on contact lenses can worsen dry eye symptoms and low-grade inflammation of the front surface of the eyes.

The following are suggestions for improving simultaneous contact lens wear and cosmetics use:

1) Insert lenses before applying makeup.

2) Remove lenses before using makeup removers.

3) Use proper contact lens materials that better resist deposits from cosmetics.

4) Use proper contact lens cleaners that do a better job of removing cosmetic buildup.

5) Use proper contact lens modalities that better resist deposits from cosmetics.

6) Dispose of mascara every three months.

7) Avoid the use of soaps with moisturizers when inserting or removing contacts.

For more information on contact lenses and eye exams, please contact Bright Eye Care & Vision Development in Sugar Land.

“Eye-Opening” Contact Lens Statistics

 

Contact Lenses Sugar Land Eye Doctor

Contact Lenses Sugar Land

* 10 times greater risk of infection when patients sleep in contact lenses compared to wearing the lenses only during the day

* 4 times greater risk of infection when wearing lenses beyond the recommended replacement schedule

* 1.5 to 2 times greater risk of infection in patients who do not wash their hands before handling their contact lenses

* up to 75% of patients do not “rub and rinse” their contact lenses when disinfecting them

* close to 1 out of every 4 patients do not use new disinfecting solution every night

* the use of old disinfecting solution increases the risk for infection

* up to 80% of patients do not clean their contact lens case daily

* 3.7 times greater risk of infection with dirty contact lens cases

* Acanthamoeba cysts may be present in tap water and can survive for years even after the water evaporates

Visit Sugar Land Contact Lenses for more information.

Next blog: Healthy Tips for Contact Lens Wear

Sports Tinted Contacts Can Help

Bryce Harper

Athletes like Bryce Harper (baseball), Marques Colston (football) and Justin Leonard (golf) do it. Could it help you?

Sports-tinted contacts have been shown to help athletes recover vision faster in bright sunlight, achieve better visual recognition in bright sunlight and improve visual performance when alternating between bright and shaded conditions. This means that a batter who is in the shade looking out at the brightly lit mound will be able to see the pitcher’s release point and spin of the ball better as it moves from the sunshine into the shade. This also means that a tennis player playing on a hot, sunny day will be able to better pick up the tennis ball off their opponent’s racquet. By improving the ability to quickly and clearly identify objects in varying lighting conditions and against backgrounds of varying color, an athlete can improve sports performance. There are two ways to improve this skill: 1) Sports Vision Training (https://brighteyeandvision.com/e.d.g.e.-sports-vision.html) and 2) Sports Tinted Contacts (https://brighteyeandvision.com/sports-tint-contacts.html).

Go to Sugar Land Eye Doctor to learn more.