Dyslexia, Reading Disability and Vision

sweet little girl bored under stress asking for help in hate school concept

Students who experience the following vision-related symptoms were shown to have more academic difficulties according to a clinical study involving elementary school children:

• Headaches with near work
• Words running together when reading
• Burning, itching or watery eyes
• Skipping/repeating lines when reading
• Head tilt/closing one eye when reading
• Difficulty copying from the board
• Avoiding near work/reading
• Omitting small words when reading
• Writing uphill or downhill
• Misaligning digits in columns
• Holds reading materials too closely
• Trouble maintaining attention when reading
• Difficulty completing assignments on time
• Always says, “I can’t” even before trying
• Clumsy, knocks things over
• Loses things/belongings
• Forgetful/poor memory

If a child is struggling at school and he/she is experiencing any of the above, then a visual skills evaluation would be recommended. A routine eye exam would not uncover undiagnosed visual skills problems that may be contributing to that child’s academic struggles.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

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Overlooked Risks at School

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Aside from backpacks, pencils, papers and other school supplies, have you also provided protection for your child from the long-term environmental dangers lurking in classrooms and hallways? Digital light and energy-efficient lighting in schools increase risks for macular degeneration, eyestrain, sleep disturbances and cataracts. Clinical studies, in fact, indicate that children absorb more of this harmful light. Symptoms of eyestrain include sore and irritated eyes and difficulty focusing.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Concussions and Soccer

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While watching this news report on concussions and soccer, do not overlook the fact that the male brain also shows brain damage on the MRI.

For more information on concussions, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Back to School, Vision and Academic Success

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In a clinical study involving 4th and 5th grade students who had eyesight worse than 20/25, more than 60% of those students suffered from reading difficulties.

Reading is the primary route of learning in school, and 80% of what a child learns first filters through the visual system. Screenings at nurses’ and pediatricians’ offices can miss up to 50% of the visual problems that affect reading, writing and learning.

A yearly eye exam is recommended for every child entering school. In children who are struggling with academics, a more in-depth visual skills exam is needed to investigate how the eyes, brain and entire visual system are working. These visual skills – eye coordination, focusing, fine eye movements, etc… – affect academics. Not every eye doctor – optometrist or ophthalmologist – tests and treats visual skills. With school just right around the corner, start with a yearly eye exam, and then if needed, follow-up with a thorough visual skills exam.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Back-to-School Fort Bend ISD

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Children with eye coordination dysfunction (this is not referring to an eye turn/strabismus) scored higher on a parent survey about poor academic performance compared to children without eye coordination difficulties. In other words, children with eye coordination dysfunction had more academic concerns than children without eye coordination dysfunction. The following were the questions asked on the parent survey:

• How often does your child have difficulty completing assignments at school?
• How often does your child have difficulty completing homework?
• How often does your child avoid or say he/she does not want to do tasks that require reading or close work?
• How often does your child fail to give attention to details or make careless mistakes in schoolwork or homework?
• How often do you worry about your child’s school performance?

Eye coordination dysfunction can be successfully treated.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Standardized Tests and Vision

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Scantron test forms are prevalent across schools. Vision problems can make it more difficult for some students to achieve their full academic success on these forms. A recent study showed that children with amblyopia or strabismus required approximately 30% LONGER TO COMPLETE multiple choice answer sheets. In addition, other studies show that amblyopia also SLOWS DOWN READING SPEED.

The authors of the study concluded that amblyopia and strabismus can hinder students from achieving their full academic success on timed, standardized tests. Amblyopia and strabismus can be successfully treated.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Optometric Vision Therapy Near Me and Reading

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• Students with worse eye movements also showed worse reading fluency and comprehension

• Improved eye movements through vision therapy led to improved fluency and comprehension

• Treatment in the fall led to more improvements compared to treatment in the spring

Reading is the primary route of learning in school. Students who read proficiently in 3rd grade are more likely to graduate from high school and achieve greater economic success. On the flipside, poor reading has been associated with behavioral and social problems in schools. If a child does not read at grade level by 4th grade, his/her future of success is at risk.

Reading requires a complex array of skills to work in concert – language, attention, information processing, vision and eye movements. Eye movements are an important part of the physical act of reading. Poor eye movements can lead to slow reading which decreases fluency. In turn, poor fluency adversely affects reading comprehension. An apt analogy would be riding a bicycle. In order to ride successfully, you need to build up a certain amount of speed; otherwise, you will fall off of the bicycle. Fluency affects reading comprehension in a similar manner, and eye movements influence fluency.

In a study involving more than six hundred elementary students across two different states, improvements in eye movements through optometric vision therapy was shown to improve fluency and comprehension compared to reading skills instruction alone. The treatment group on average showed 50% more improvement in fluency and 300% more improvement in comprehension than the group that did not receive therapy. This improvement held true even in the “high-needs” group which showed pre-treatment fluency at the 26th percentile compared to the 67th percentile for the rest of the students and pre-treatment comprehension at the 40th percentile compared to the 63rd percentile for the rest of the students.

We specialize in optometric vision therapy and its effects on academics. For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

Watch Your Step: How Vision Leads Locomotion

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Using new technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin come one step closer in determining what is going on in the brain while we walk, paving the way for better treatment for mobility impairments — strokes, aging and Parkinson’s — and technology development — prosthetics and robots.

Walking on natural terrain takes precise coordination between vision and body movements to efficiently and stably traverse any given path. But until now, both vision and locomotion have been studied separately within controlled lab environments, limiting understanding of how various neural and biological systems work together to navigate the natural world.

“One of the beautiful things about visually guided walking is that it involves every level of our perceptuomotor hierarchy. To really understand it, you need to know how vision works, how planning works, how muscles work, how spines work, how physics work,” said Jonathan Matthis, a postdoctoral researcher in the UT Austin Center for Perceptual Systems.

Matthis’ research, published in Cell this April, combined new motion-capture and eye-tracking technologies to track distinct patterns between the two mechanisms. To do so, researchers jerry-rigged a welding mask around an eye tracker — to shade the infrared eye cameras from sunlight — and developed new methods to calibrate the eye tracker with a motion-tracking suit to record gaze and full-body kinematics as participants navigated through three types of terrain: flat, medium and rough terrain.

“Eye movements are incredibly informative as a window into the cognitive process,” Matthis said. “By tracking eyes, we get a clear picture of the kind of information the central nervous system needs to complete any given task.”

Researchers found that participants displayed distinct walking and gaze patterns in each of the terrains. Subjects walked quickly with longer strides on the flat terrain, looking down only about half of the time to briefly scan the upcoming path for obstacles.

On the medium and rough terrain, steps became shorter, slower and more variable, with participants looking at the ground more than 90 percent of the time to precisely fixate upcoming footholds. In the medium terrain, walkers focused primarily on where their foot would be in two steps. The rough terrain required walkers to split their gaze between their future foot placement in two and three steps to allow for longer-term path planning.

Despite these differences, an unexpected pattern emerged: In all three terrains, participants consistently looked 1.5 seconds ahead of their current location. This finding is similar to lookahead timing seen in research on other motor actions — stair climbing, driving and reaching — suggesting that this timing plays an important role in human movement.

“The constant lookahead time suggests that walkers are maintaining some sort of global locomotor strategy that is being tuned to each specific environment,” Matthis said. “Walkers use gaze to ensure that they always know what will be coming up 1.5 seconds down the path.

“Good action decisions require not only good sensory data, but also a consideration of the costs and benefits of the action,” Matthis said. “Taking this type of research out of the lab and into the real world allows us to observe human behavior in its natural environment. This gives us more opportunity to discover things we didn’t expect, which will help us advance our scientific knowledge to the benefit of improving clinical treatment of gait-related disorders.”

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180423125047.htm

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

 

 

Concussion Duration and Treatment in Sugar Land, TX

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The most common initial symptoms after suffering a concussion are headache, dizziness and fatigue. However, other secondary symptoms often develop afterwards that affect emotional status and cognitive ability. The time course of these symptoms can be debilitating for students. According to a study involving almost 300 students between the ages of 11 to 22 years, one week after injury:

• more than two-thirds still suffered from headache
• a majority still complained about poor concentration, dizziness, fatigue and taking longer to think
• more than 40% still struggled with forgetfulness, light sensitivity and noise sensitivity.

Various studies have shown that eye movements are intimately affected post-concussion. Research also shows that improving eye movements will help improve concussion symptoms. A study involving college athletes even showed that improving eye movements helped reduce the incidence of concussions.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.

From High School to College Athletics: The Missing Link

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Have you ever wondered why some of the biggest, tallest, fastest high school athletes never even have a chance to play in college much less in the pros? Here are some statistics compiled by the NCAA:

• 3.3% of high school women basketball players compete in college
• 3.0% of high school men basketball players compete in college
• 5.7% of high school football players compete in college
• 5.5% of high school men soccer players compete in college
• 9.3% of high school women soccer players compete in college

Here is a common, and often overlooked reason, for not being able to continue as quoted by the head athletic trainer of the NHL’s Carolina Hurricanes:

“As I look at all the trends in sports medicine and how things are constantly changing to improve the athlete’s performance, one aspect stands alone as the most underrated attribute an athlete can develop. Without question, in my 30 years as a physical therapist, athletic trainer and strength coach, I have found that we underestimate the importance of vision.

To realize just how important vision is, try testing athletes’ muscles with the athletes looking at their own muscle and then again with them looking away. They will immediately notice an improvement in strength. Another quick test is to have athletes evaluate their vertical jump with a downward gaze versus an upward gaze. The upward gaze adds a minimum of two inches to their vertical height. The old adage that the eyes drive the body is very appropriate for these two tests.

The subject of eyes is in every aspect of my sports medicine program. It starts at the NHL combine where results of vision scores are taken under serious consideration during the NHL Draft. It has been shown that the single-best fitness score that correlates to the chance of making the NHL are results from the combine vision tests. During preseason testing, eye scores are again scrutinized by management and coaching staff. It is almost always a certainty that our best goaltenders and best face-off athletes score the highest.

Another area in which we utilize eye scores is when making sure an athlete’s vision is back to normal after suffering a concussion. I believe this is a critical area to which we often don’t devote enough attention. We generally look at many other signs and symptoms but fall short when it comes to making sure the vision is back to normal. This, then, may put the athlete in harm’s way and at risk of another injury or exacerbating the present symptoms, thus setting back the athlete.”

The eye scores that he is referring to involve more than just whether the athlete needs contacts or glasses to see 20/20 or better. Don’t let vision hold you or your athlete back from achieving his/her best. Be evaluated. We can help improve your vision for sports. We have already done so for a number of athletes.

For more information, contact Sugar Land, TX eye doctors and optometrists at Bright Eye Care & Vision Development.

References available upon request.

Medical Disclaimer. The information on this site is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. All content, including text, graphics, images and information, contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only.